A sign of things to come

These signs sprouted on Mass. Ace. cross streets earlier today. Above: Lake St. looking north.

These signs sprouted on Mass. Ace. cross streets earlier today. Above: Lake St. looking north.

As promised last week, workers from Mass. Ave. Contractor J.H. Lynch today erected construction signs on cross streets leading to Mass. Ave.

The brightly painted plywood signs are mounted on sturdy posts of pressure-treated wood so as to span a height of about 7–10 feet above the sidewalk.

At the same time, surveyors have been further marking up Mass. Ave with paint and metal stakes.

This surveyor gets a police escort while marking a spot in the center of Mass. Ave. by Phillips Auto Glass on May 27.

This surveyor gets a police escort while marking a spot in the center of Mass. Ave. by Phillips Auto Glass on May 27.

MAve center

Surveyors at work in the center of the road on May 28. The view is northwest from the Thorndike St. crosswalk.

Survey work continued the next day too.

The construction signs appear just a day after the first meeting of Mass. Ave. businesses to anticipate and manage the economic impact of the project.

Next up: a pre-construction information meeting at the Thompson School on June 16 (7 pm), open to all.

And then: Could construction really start at last?

Surveyor on point by 99 Mass. Ave. on May 28.

Surveyor on point by 99 Mass. Ave. on May 28.

Mass. Ave. seen looking north from Orvis Rd.The dangerous Orvis-Grafton crosswalk is visible in the background at right.

Mass. Ave. seen looking north from Orvis Rd. The dangerous Orvis-Grafton crosswalk is visible in the background at right.

One of the new signs appeared on Orvis Rd. near the crosswalk where a motorist struck and killed a woman last year.

 

Flags at the corner of Orvis and Mass. Ave.

Flags at the corner of Orvis and Mass. Ave.

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1 comment so far

  1. Douglass Davidoff on

    The Orvis-Grafton crosswalk has become a touchpoint for me ever since the death at that location last year. I like to think that every time — every. single. time. — I slow down, look carefully at the tiger-striped crosswalk and at the sidewalks, and proceed only after being absolutely convinced the pedestrian area is unoccupied. I like to think I’m being just as careful at every other crosswalk in town.

    And yet, I catch myself being momentarily preoccupied. Or I slow down and another motorist races past me. These crossings scare me, not least because I am also on occasion the pedestrian in the crossing.

    I hope the town and the contractors will initiate a “Give ’em a brake” safety campaign to keep the construction crew members safe during the construction. I hope such a campaign can be combined with keeping pedestrians safe, too, as they cross Mass Ave. As motorists with local knowledge and as motorists who know the consequences that inattention has brought so sadly to our town, we must set an example for other less-informed motorists who transit out town so that our central thoroughfare is safe this summer for construction workers and safe year-around for pedestrians. At night and during rain and snow, it’s especially important.

    America’s railroads have pioneered this kind of crossing safety public awareness campaign. “Operation Lifesaver” for four decades has reminded motorists of dangers of crossing active railroads when lights are flashing or gates are down. Check out http://www.oli.org. A similar campaign could help Arlingtonians be mindful of the dangers of motoring through pedestrian crossings without actively examining the vicinity for pedestrians.


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